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Silky Smooth Roast Butternut Squash Soup

The flavours of fennel and sage give this simple roast butternut squash soup a sprinkle of magic!

Portrait close image of a bowl of silky steaming hot roasted butternut squash soup served with fried sage leaves

Roasted Squash Soup.

It is hard to beat the orange vibrancy of pumpkin or squash to bring a splash of warming colour to your table in winter.

My version of this all-time classic soup recipe goes nowhere near pumpkin spice. Instead, we use two other flavours that are often overlooked when it comes to all things squash.

Sage and Fennel, they are certainly no strangers to pumpkin, both are extremely classic combinations.

Now fennel bulbs are not in season at pumpkin time but the seeds are available all year round, as are sage leaves.

The combination is stunning!

And as for roasting the squash, well that adds an intensity of flavour that is stunning.

It is exactly the same thought process behind my roast carrot soup and my roasted tomato soups!

Portrait image of a bowl of silky roast butternut squash soup served with fried sage leaves

Can You Use Different Types Of Pumpkin?

Yes, and the process is identical too!

All pumpkin have a subtly different flavour although generally speaking you will be hard pushed to tell the difference.

The main differences are in texture, moisture content and sugar content.

Given that we are blending this soup then the texture makes little difference.

The moisture levels do though, so add the stock a little at a time to get the texture you want.

Portrait overhead image of a bowl of silky roast butternut squash soup served with fried sage leaves

Recipe Hints and Tips.

The real secret behind this soup is its silky smooth texture and the real secret behind that texture is the final step.

Passing the soup through a fine mesh sieve achieves that texture.

It is a technique I advocate for anything from a pea puree through to the sauce I serve with my Chinese Spare ribs.

I like to serve this soup with some crispy sage leaves.

They are simple to cook. Just add a little oil to the base of a pan and drop in your sage leaves.

They will crisp up in 10-15 seconds, transfer to some kitchen paper and sprinkle with salt.

Square overhead image of a bowl of silky roast butternut squash soup served with fried sage leaves
Yield: 4 Servings

Roast Butternut Squash Soup Recipe

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 1 hour 15 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 25 minutes

Forget overly sweet and rank average Butternut Squash soup, this roasted affair is lively with the taste of fennel and sage! 

Ingredients

  • 1 kg Butternut Squash
  • 6 Cloves Garlic
  • 2 Tbsp Olive Oil
  • 500 ml Vegetable stock
  • 150 g Onion
  • 150 g Carrot
  • 150 g Celery
  • 10 Sage Leaves
  • 2 Tsp Fennel Seeds
  • Salt and pepper

Instructions

  1. Cut your squash in half and scoop out the seeds and any pulp.
  2. Peel and roughly slice half of the garlic.
  3. Make incisions in the cut side of the squash flesh and poke in the garlic slithers you created.
  4. Drizzle the cut side of the squash with half of the olive oil and a generous sprinkle of salt and lots of black pepper.
  5. Place in the oven along with the remaining garlic cloves and roast for 1 hour at 200°C or 400°F.
  6. Whilst the squash is roasting place the dice the carrot, celery and onion in a pan with 1 Tbsp cooking oil.
  7. Add in the sage leaves and fennel seeds.
  8. Allow to sweat down slowly for 20 minutes with a lid.
  9. When cooked scrape the flesh from the roasted squash and squeeze the pulp from the roasted garlic.
  10. Add this pulp, the onion mix and the vegetable stock to a blender and blitz.
  11. Test for seasoning and add more salt and pepper as required.
  12. I like to pass this soup through a fine sieve to end up with the silkiest of smooth soups.

Notes

I like to serve with some fried sage leaves.

Nutrition Information:

Yield:

4

Serving Size:

1

Amount Per Serving: Calories: 214Total Fat: 7gSaturated Fat: 1gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 6gCholesterol: 0mgSodium: 495mgCarbohydrates: 38gFiber: 11gSugar: 10gProtein: 4g

Calorific details are provided by a third-party application and are to be used as indicative figures only.

Did you make this recipe?

If you made this recipe, I'd love to see what you did and what I can do better, share a picture with me on Instagram and tag me @krumplibrian and tell me how it went!

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Jacqueline Debono

Wednesday 16th of May 2018

I love the taste of roasted squash or pumpkin, so I'm sure this soup tastes divine. Gonna put it on my to-do list!

Brian Jones

Thursday 17th of May 2018

Thank you, enjoy!

Ramona

Wednesday 16th of May 2018

Oh, yes, absolutely a winner! One of my top favourite soups - roasted everything and the fennel seeds adds so much more flavour - an absolutely superb recipe Brian! Delliccciosso!

Brian Jones

Thursday 17th of May 2018

Thanks Ramona, I love the taste of fennel.

Whitney

Tuesday 29th of March 2016

This is one of my favorite soups. It's so filling and satisfying. I've never used fennel seeds in it, but I bet roasted fennel itself would be awesome in it.

Brian Jones

Wednesday 30th of March 2016

Roasted fennel would work wonderfully too, I often use it other soups... However it does not store too well so the season is short.

Byron Thomas

Monday 28th of March 2016

Oh, come on, man! Such a fantastic soup recipe! I would have never thought about pairing butternut squash with fennel. Yum!

Brian Jones

Tuesday 29th of March 2016

I love the fennel flavour, I think the aniseed notes go really well with the sweet earthiness of pumpkin.

Hillary Reeves

Saturday 26th of March 2016

Looks like I need to try this soup out... I always think I hate all things pumpkin too, haha!!

Brian Jones

Tuesday 29th of March 2016

I have become a pumpkin convert over recent years, not having a sweet tooth I often used to find pumpkin dishes way too sweet for me but am slowly getting savoury dishes just about right.