Vegetarian Toad in the Hole with Balsamic Roasted Vegetables

This Vegetarian Toad in the Hole takes the best roots of the season, roasts them in balsamic vinegar. Then finishes off them off in a rosemary batter, a whole new take on a British classic.

Portrait overhead image of a vegetarian toad in the hole featuring roasted vegetables instead of sausages presented and cooked in a cast iron skillet against a wooden background

Vegetarian Toad in the Hole.

There are two foods that I view as quintessentially British, Yorkshire Pudding and Toad in the Hole.

This is another variant of this classic British rustic frugal treat. Although Iโ€™m pretty sure my Grandad who was a butcher will be turning in his grave at the thought of this Roasted Vegetable Toad in the Hole!

Not just because he would have no idea what Balsamic Vinegar is! But also a because Vegetable Toad in the Hole would be sacrilege.

This recipe is not a sacrifice in any way shape or form. I love roasted vegetables as much as I love sausages.

So adding them to a Yorkshire pudding batter and turning them into a toad in the hole just makes sense.

Portrait image of a vegetarian toad in the hole featuring roasted vegetables instead of sausages presented and cooked in a cast iron skillet against a dark background

Can I Use Different Vegetables?

Now this version of my vegetarian toad in the hole uses roots.

Carrots, parsnips and red onions however I would urge you not get too wrapped up on these ingredients.

Experiment and play with what is good in your local market.

Some of my favourites are fennel and leek, roasted pumpkin and onion, cauliflower and broccoli.

Seriously take 2 or 3 things that work really well together and go for it!

If they are not gonna cook in 20 minutes give them a bit of a headstart by either roasting or steaming.

Then just let them finish off in the Yorkshire Pudding batter and serve hot and steaming.

I talk in detail about the perfect Yorkshire pudding batter in my Foolproof Yorkie recipe.

Close up portrait image of vegetarian toad in the hole featuring roasted vegetables instead of sausages

What to Serve with Toad in the Hole.

Whilst a good onion gravy is a traditional and fine accompaniment to a toad in the hole I confessed in my traditional recipe that my favourite accompaniment is peas and ketchup. Yes, I am still a child!

However, for this Roasted Vegetable Toad in the Hole, my choice of accompanied is a little more grown up.

A stripped back version of Petits Pois a la Francaise. 

Now that might sound all fancy pants, but it is nowt but some braised peas and baby gem lettuce.

I even omit the cream and just cut the baby gem lettuce in half, then brown in an obscene amount of butter.

After that, I just turn them over and add some stock and peas and steam for 5 minutes.

Landscape overhead image of a vegetarian toad in the hole featuring roasted vegetables instead of sausages presented and cooked in a cast iron skillet against a wooden background
Vegetarian Toad in the Hole

Vegetarian Toad in the Hole

Yield: 2 Servings
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 45 minutes
Resting Time: 4 hours
Total Time: 4 hours 50 minutes

Do not accept insipid vegetarian sausages in a vegetarian toad in the hole, take wonderful in season vegetables and roast them in balsamic vinegar. The chuck em in the oven with your Yorkshire pudding batter, you will seriously love this dish!

Ingredients

  • 2 large eggs
  • Flour (The same volume as the eggs)
  • Milk (The same volume as the eggs)
  • 1/4 Tsp Salt
  • 1/4 Tsp Black Pepper
  • 1 Tsp Dried Rosemary
  • 150 g Carrot
  • 100 g Parsnip
  • 200 g Large Red Onion
  • 2 Tbsp Flavourless Cooking Oil
  • 50 ml Balsamic Vinegar
  • 50 g Butter

Instructions

  1. Sift the flour into a large mixing bowl and add the beaten egg and milk and mix to form a batter.
  2. Mix in the thyme, salt and pepper and set aside for at least 4 hours.
  3. Preheat your oven to 250ยฐC or 475ยฐF, whilst the oven is heating up place a 25cm skillet in there with the cooking oil to heat up.
  4. Peel the vegetables and cut the carrots and parsnips to roughly the same size. I like to keep them long, cut the carrots in half and then match the parsnips to that size.
  5. Cut the red onion into quarters leaving some of the root to hold it together.
  6. Bring a large pan of salted water to the boil and add the carrot and parsnip to the boiling water and cook for 10 minutes until they begin to soften.
  7. Remove the skillet and then roll around the vegetables to get a little colour.
  8. Now add in the balsamic vinegar and transfer to the oven for 10 minutes.
  9. Pour the batter over the vegetables and then close the oven and roast for 20 minutes.
  10. Serve with a sticky balsamic reduction.

Notes

I use three identical bowls to get the same volumetric quantities for the flour, egg and milk. Simply crack the eggs into one and then fill up the other two bowls with flour and milk to the same level.

If you are not vegetarian try cooking this in a hard animal fat like lard, beef dripping or duck fat, it will blow your mind ๐Ÿ˜‰

Nutrition Information:
Yield: 2 Serving Size: 1
Amount Per Serving: Calories: 633Total Fat: 41gSaturated Fat: 16gTrans Fat: 1gUnsaturated Fat: 22gCholesterol: 244mgSodium: 608mgCarbohydrates: 54gFiber: 7gSugar: 14gProtein: 14g
Calorific details are provided by a third-party application and are to be used as indicative figures only.

12 thoughts on this Recipe:

  1. I saw this on Instagram and was blown away. GENIUS IDEA!!!

    I tagged a veggie friend and I am going to try this once our weather cools down!

    Reply
  2. Toad in the hole is such a great and underestimated meal. Try explaining what it is to anyone that isn’t British is perhaps a little tricky. Making it with roasted vegetables is a fab idea, and a suitable alternative for the non-meat eaters. Have to say it looks really delicious.

    Reply
    • Thanks Helen, it really is so uniquely British, I posted up the straight up and down sausage version last winter and a great deal of confusion was caused by the glorious name ๐Ÿ˜‰

      Reply
  3. Never heard of toad in the whole before but this looks very exciting. Looks like I will need to check out your blog more in detail. I have heard of Yorkshire pudding but that’s it. ^.^ Thanks for sharing your vegetarian version.

    Reply
  4. I’ve never even thought about doing toad in the hole with anything other than sausages before. Great idea for when I’m craving a crispy filled Yorkshire pudding but don’t have any sausages on hand!

    Reply
    • I’ve been cooking it for years and often serve it as a side to a roasted piece of meat, just chuck it in the oven whilst the joint is resting ๐Ÿ™‚

      Reply
  5. This sound like a fun recipe to try. I’ve seen something like this during my visit to Europe but never ate cause the word ‘Toad’ ๐Ÿ˜‰ But I’ll try this soon as its looks so yum.

    Reply
    • It is indeed an odd name and no one has any idea where the name came from but it stuck and has been around for a couple of hundred years ๐Ÿ˜ฎ

      Reply

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