Skillet Toad in the Hole

Toad in the Hole is about as British as can be and probably the defining food memory from my childhood! Sausages in a Yorkshire pudding batter and baked to perfection, forget Sunday Lunches this is quintessentially British!

Skillet Toad in the Hole.

If I were to pick a dish that screams of my childhood I would have to say it is Toad in the Hole. It is so simple it hurts and is packed full of so many memories for me.

Let’s face it the best food is always built on memories.

It may be hard to believe but I was a fairly picky eater as a child. Trying to get me to eat a vegetable that was not a potato was, let’s just say ‘challenging’. By potato, I mean chips, not crisps, but fries as you Americans would say.

Toad in the Hole is about as British as can be, sausages in a Yorkshire pudding batter and baked to perfection, forget Sunday Lunches this is quintessentially British!

A Vegetarian Toad In The Hole!

Dishes like this that did not go anywhere near a vegetable must have been a godsend for my Mother.

Fortunately, I grew up, in some ways at least! I now eat a whole host of stuff you would have needed to strap me down to eat when I was young.

In fact, I even make a version of Toad in the Hole with roasted carrots and parsnips, but for me, the original can’t be beaten.

Toad in the Hole is about as British as can be, sausages in a Yorkshire pudding batter and baked to perfection, forget Sunday Lunches this is quintessentially British!

Nostalgic Food.

Not only is Toad in the Hole one of the most nostalgic dishes in my ‘armory’. It also probably just about takes the coolest name for a dish ever away from ‘Bubble and Squeak’.

Another whimsically beautiful name from the archives of Britsh Food that just makes me smile!

The origins of the name Toad in the Holes are, as you can imagine, hotly debated. In reality, no one is ever further forwards. Although my favourite one features a toad on a golf course in Northumberland in the 18th Century.

It is utterly absurd but who cares, it is amusing. I love the history of food names. You should check out my Chimichurri Sauce recipe for more absurd stories that are probably untrue but still fun!

Of course, I usually use my own homemade sausages for this recipe but seriously buy what you like. Just match the herbs in the batter with whatever you have going on in the sausages.

This dish is a mere idea take it where you want and create your own memories.

I have even ‘Hungarianised’ Toad in the Hole with lots of Paprika in the batter and a homemade veal sausage with loads of caraway and parsley.

Go wild and crazy and post your pictures online and tag me, I would love to see your Toad in the Hole.

Toad in the Hole is about as British as can be, sausages in a Yorkshire pudding batter and baked to perfection, forget Sunday Lunches this is quintessentially British!

Toad in the Hole Batter.

The key to any toad in the hole recipe is as much about the batter as it is about the sausages. It is essentially a Yorkshire pudding batter and shock horror I swear by the volume method.

I have been pretty scathing about using cup measurements in the past. Primarily because I am a savoury cook and I have no idea what on earth a cup of broccoli is.

But for a Toad in the Hole Batter using equal volumes of flour, eggs and milk work perfectly. You don’t need to be too particular break your eggs into a bowl and then pour out the same milk and flour into the same size bowls.

You can, of course, use the batter straight away but resting for at least three hours helps the rise.

On a final note, let’s talk fat… Lard, duck fat, goose fat is where it is at, your crispier bits will be crispier and your soggier bits will be tastier. But if you want to then swap for oil.

Toad in the Hole is about as British as can be, sausages in a Yorkshire pudding batter and baked to perfection, forget Sunday Lunches this is quintessentially British!

Toad in the Hole is about as British as can be, sausages in a Yorkshire pudding batter and baked to perfection, forget Sunday Lunches this is quintessentially British!

Skillet Toad in the Hole

5 from 3 votes
Toad in the Hole is about as British as can be, sausages in a Yorkshire pudding batter and baked to perfection, forget Sunday Lunches this is quintessentially British!
Course Main Course
Cuisine British
Keyword Easy Toad in the Hole Dinner, Fast Onepot Dish, Skillet Toad in the Hole Recipe
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 25 minutes
Resting time 3 hours
Total Time 30 minutes
Servings 2
Calories 1100kcal
Author Brian Jones

Ingredients

  • 30 g Lard Shortening in the US: If you don't want to use lard use another fat/oil with a very high smoke point
  • 1 Cup Eggs Roughly 3 large eggs beaten
  • 1 Cup Plain Flour You want the same volume as the eggs, so use less or more as needed
  • 1 Cup Milk You want the same volume as the eggs, so use less or more as needed
  • 1/8 Tsp Coarse Sea Salt
  • Good Grind Of Black Pepper
  • 1/2 Tsp Dried Thyme
  • 4 Large Sausages Use what ever you like I personally opt for my own homemade pork sausages but anything that you really like so long as they are fairly lean will be great

Instructions

  • Place the lard in your skillet and then put it in the oven that is set as hot as it can be.
  • Sift the flour into a large mixing bowl and add the beaten egg and milk and mix to form a batter. As with all Yorkshire pudding mixes they perform better if left to stand for at least 3 hours.
  • Mix in the thyme, salt and pepper.
  • Brown of the sausages in a pan for a couple of minutes.
  • When the oven is searingly hot, pour in the batter then add the sausages and cook for 20-25 minutes.

Video

Notes

This would traditionally be served with some vegetables and an onion gravy, however my glorious wife introduced me to her tradition of eating it with garden peas and tomato ketchup... Dirty yes, tasty, hell yeah!
Toad in the Hole is about as British as can be, sausages in a Yorkshire pudding batter and baked to perfection, forget Sunday lunches this is quintessentially British! #bangers #britishfood #recipe #traditionalbritishfood #britishrecipes #recipeideas #recipeoftheday

Readers Comments

34 thoughts on “Skillet Toad in the Hole”

  1. Toad in the hole is just the best comfort food!!!
    I hope every child in the UK has fond memories of it??
    I NEED to make my own sausages!!!! I bet it is out of the world good with home made bangers.
    p.s love the thyme! I always add a spoonful of grain mustard to my pudding mixture. (Because that is was my Mum did!)

    • Making your own sausage is pure genius, my uncle is a butcher and taught me howto link them properly but other than that it is definitely not as difficult as they made it look on the Generation Game, more childhood memories.

      I’ve done mustard in the past and it works really well I’m pretty sure I change the flavouring everytime I cook this based on the sausages. I also do one with roasted vegetables rather than sausages that is superb, it is all about good comforting stuff in batter that really matters 😀

  2. Wow! Never had toad in a hole but I’m going to make it as soon as possible, I’ve just brought some sausages from Switzerland that will be wonderfully used with your recipe!

    • It is a properly old fashioned British dish dating back a couple of hundred years, I’ve seen the name utilised in all sorts of bizarre ways but it is essentially sausages in a batter. Enjoy, we love it as a lazy day dinner 🙂

  3. Love Toad in the hole! Grew up with it for Sunday dinner. I ‘m American , my mum is English . We’ve had it with veg & gravy Or
    when we were kids Ketchup & Peas?Love your idea of the skillet for the health benefits. Any idea of oven Temp. ? And my local grocery has English Bangers
    maybe if people request them?

    • I guess I picked up some subliminal learning as I was born into a long line of ‘Butchers’ on my mothers side 😉 In all fairness I only started making them when I moved to Hungary and had some pretty horrendous first attempts and my uncle taught me how to link them properly on one of his visits.

  4. I LOVE the idea behind this dish Brian — and it sounds delicious. I’d imagine the thyme with the pudding and sausages tastes pretty much amazing 🙂 Yet another one of your AMAZING dishes going on my “to try soon” list! Question on the oil – we have a version of vegetable shortening here in the US, but I always shy away from using it because it isn’t that great for you. I know that peanut oil has a high smoke point…but do you think I could I use a vegetable oil?

    • Thanks Paige, you should be able to get away with vegetable and sunflower oil, both have a smoke point of around 225°C I use beef fat which is closer to 250°C, but try and keep your oil below that temperature and cook a little longer. You can cook this batter (which is a basic yorkshire pudding batter) at a lower temperature and for longer although it is not a method I am fond of but many swear by it.

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