Loading...

Duck a l’orange

Welcome to another retro throwback recipe, Duck a l'orange may hark back to the 70's dinner parties but it still has a relevant place on any dinner table if you ask me!

It would seem that food nostalgia is strong in me at the moment and whilst duck a l’orange was never present on our menu growing up just the name seemed to be the very definition of ‘ooooo look at me’ food. It has become a bit of a staple in recent years on my table, it is really a simple dish and the rich duck just loves that whole sweet and sour thing. It may sound odd, many folk associate sweet and sour with Asian food but it really is a common theme across the globe, hell just grab a bite of your favourite burger and I’m pretty sure you will find that flavour combo in there some how with the sour edge coming from pickles or mustard and the sweet from your bbq sauce, ketchup or fried onions. It is just one of those irresistible combinations that you trip over time and time again in World food.

Duck a l’orange pretty much typifies french food for me, a real fancy ass name that means something really simple that is in fact all about good ingredients treated fairly simply to create beautiful food. There is nothing hard in this dish at all, and you can ignore my serving suggestions if you like and serve it with what ever takes your fancy. But I urge you to give it a try, it is a realtreat with flavours that just work perfectly together!

Like this recipe? Then you should definitely check out this one!  Coronation Chicken Rebooted

Anyway back to food nostalgia, what does it for you? It would seem that I am on a run at the moment with so many recipes from my childhood like hotpot, chicken and mushroom pie and stroganoff all making appearances in the last 4 weeks. I also have a real childhood favourite of mine guaranteed to raise eyebrows next Tuesday, the humble British faggot! No it does not mean that!

Welcome to another retro throwback recipe, Duck a l'orange may hark back to the 70's dinner parties but it still has a relevant place on any dinner table if you ask me!
Print

Duck a l'orange

Welcome to another retro throwback recipe, Duck a l'orange may hark back to the 70's dinner parties but it still has a relevant place on any dinner table if you ask me!

Course Main Course
Cuisine French
Servings 2
Author Brian Jones

Ingredients

For the Jerusalem artichoke Puree:

  • 150 g Jerusalem Artichoke: Peeled.
  • 75 ml Heavy Cream.
  • Salt: To taste.
  • Pepper: To taste.

For the Seared Sprouts and Shallots:

  • 150 g Brussel Sprouts: Outer leaves removed and cut in half.
  • 50 g Shallot: Peeled and cut in half with the skin removed and broken into leaves.
  • Salt: To taste.
  • Pepper: To taste,

For the Duck a l'Orange:

  • 2 Duck Breasts: Score the skin of your duck breasts into a 1 cm diamond.
  • 30 g Sugar.
  • 3 Oranges: You will need the zest of all three, the juice of two and the flesh of the third cut carefully into segments.
  • 2 Tbsp Red Wine Vinegar.
  • 200 ml Chicken Stock.
  • 25 g Butter.
  • 1 Star Anise.

Instructions

For the Jerusalem artichoke Puree (40 minutes):

  1. Boil the Jerusalem artichokes on boiling salted water until soft.

  2. Blend with the the cream adding salt and pepper as required to forma smooth puree.

  3. Gently reheat when ready to serve.

For the Seared Sprouts and Shallots (15 Minutes):

  1. Boil the sprouts in salted water for 5 minutes.

  2. Drain the sprouts and add to the pan with the duck and sear along with the shallot leaves for 10 minutes.

For the Duck a l'Orange (30 minutes):

  1. Place the sugar in the base of a pan with the star anise and heat over a medium heat.

  2. When it starts to form a golden caramel colour add in the orange juice, stock and red wine vinegar along with the orange zest.

  3. Reduce this sauce down to around 100-150ml.

  4. Meanwhile season your duck breast with salt and pepper and place in a pan skin side down over a medium high heat and cook until nice and golden and the fat has begun to render down.

  5. Flip over and cook until cooked to your desired level.

  6. Remove form the pan cover and rest for 5 minutes before carving.

  7. Whilst the duck is resting add the orange segments and butter to the sauce to finish.

Welcome to another retro throwback recipe, Duck a l'orange may hark back to the 70's dinner parties but it still has a relevant place on any dinner table if you ask me!
Welcome to another retro throwback recipe, Duck a l'orange may hark back to the 70's dinner parties but it still has a relevant place on any dinner table if you ask me!
2017-12-01T05:28:37+00:00

10 Comments

  1. Dannii December 1, 2017 at 10:35 am - Reply

    My husband loves duck, but I never cook it for some reason. This looks really simple and delicious – I will have to give it a try.

  2. Helen of Fuss Free Flavours December 1, 2017 at 12:01 pm - Reply

    A truly nostalgic dish, but an all time classic. It is as if the flavours were born to go together, because they fit so perfectly. This kind of meal would sit happily on my table at any point in the festive season. Delicious.

    • Brian Jones December 4, 2017 at 8:28 am - Reply

      Thanks Helen… Retro or not classics are classic for a reason, they just kinda work.

  3. Helene December 1, 2017 at 1:56 pm - Reply

    This really looks lovely and scrumptious !!
    Thanks for such a lovely recipe

  4. Tara December 1, 2017 at 2:06 pm - Reply

    I have never actually tried duck a l’orange before. Yours looks wonderful! I love that glaze.

    • Brian Jones December 4, 2017 at 8:29 am - Reply

      You really should give it a try, a real classic 🙂

  5. lisa December 1, 2017 at 2:24 pm - Reply

    This is such a mouthwatering dish. I’ve been cooking with duck lately (confit last week and duck fat in my braised beans last night!) I am putting this on my to do list — maybe for company this weekend. It looks do-able!

    • Brian Jones December 4, 2017 at 8:29 am - Reply

      Yay for a fellow duck cooker, we are in the minority but such a great meat!

Leave A Comment

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close