Cauliflower Veloute with Turmeric Potatoes

This delicious Cauliflower Veloute with Turmeric Potatoes is a soup that combines classic French techniques with Indian flavours.

This delicious Cauliflower Veloute with Turmeric Potatoes is a soup that combines classic French techniques with Indian flavours.

I don’t do a great deal of real ‘fusion food’ however this delicious Cauliflower Veloute with Turmeric Potatoes definitely falls into that category, with some pretty classical French ideas and techniques all give a little tickle with the Indian flavours I love.

To be honest with you I have absolutely no idea where this dish came from, it is a dish I have been kicking around for a few weeks and now I have it right about where I want it.

For those of you not so experienced with Indian flavours, this is a great starting point, the flavours are fragrant and all really very distinct and I know at least one of my readers will be delighted that this Indian dish contains no chili what so ever. Of course there will be many others deeply disappointed!

Like all veloute, this cauliflower veloute lives and dies on it’s stock, essentially all we have is a stock thickened and turned into a sauce with a roux. A really old technique, so get your stock as good as you can.

This delicious Cauliflower Veloute with Turmeric Potatoes is a soup that combines classic French techniques with Indian flavours.

I make my own stocks most of the time, but I appreciate that is a step too far for many, so go out and buy a good vegetable stock and you will be all good. Whilst we are on the topic of stock I had a rather amusing ‘interaction’ on one of the most ‘famous’ foodie forums whilst I was developing this dish all about stock.

Now I’m a bit playful when it comes to calling out food bullshit. This whole conversation started when I made a rather sarcastic comment on a post that stated stock is made from bones and broth is made from meat unless it is bone broth then it is made from bones.

Apparently I was incredibly childish and stupid for asking where I get my bones for my vegetable stock. Incidentally, I say there is no difference between a stock and a broth other than the fact that we tend to write the word stock in recipes and broth on menus.

All of which is deeply unimportant, unlike the quality of your broth, stock or bouillon if you are so disposed which is incredibly important in my Indian/French cauliflour veloute with turmeric potatoes.

Oh yes I am sure I am meant to say something about the magical healing properties of turmeric, however you all know I don’t do that silly sort of thing and will instead say that they are really, really tasty and these potatoes need to be consumed in vast quantities for that reason and that reason alone ๐Ÿ˜‰

This delicious Cauliflower Veloute with Turmeric Potatoes is a soup that combines classic French techniques with Indian flavours.
Cauliflower Veloute with Turmeric Potatoes

Cauliflower Veloute with Turmeric Potatoes

Yield: 2 Servings
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 25 minutes
Total Time: 35 minutes

This delicious Cauliflower Veloute with Turmeric Potatoes is a soup that combines classic French techniques with Indian flavours.ย 

Ingredients

  • 250 g Cauliflower, Broken into florets
  • 500 ml Vegetable Stock, Use the best stock you can get
  • 1 Tbsp Dried Fenugreek Leaves
  • 1 Tbsp Coriander Seeds
  • 1 Tsp Cumin Seeds
  • 1 Tsp Black Pepper Corns
  • 30 g Butter
  • 30 g Plain Flour
  • 1 Tsp Black Onion Seeds
  • 1/2 Tbsp Flavourless Cooking Oil
  • 75 g Potato, Cut into a 5mm dice
  • 1/2 Tsp Ground Turmeric
  • 1 Garlic Clove

Instructions

  1. Begin by taking your cauliflower florets and breaking them down into florets roughly the same size and steam until very soft and gives easily with a knife, I like to reserve a few slices to fry up and serve as a garnish.
  2. Bring the vegetable stock to the boil and then reduce to a simmer, add in the fenugreek, coriander seeds, cumin seeds, onion seeds and black pepper and allow to steep for 5 minutes to impart flavour.
  3. Melt the butter in a medium saucepan over a medium heat and when melted add the flour and stir to form a roux, you want the flour to cook through but you do not want to create any colour, this should take 3-5 minutes.
  4. Now stir in the warm stock we created earlier a little at a time stirring all the while, this will eventually come together to create a silky smooth veloute, set this aside whilst we deal with the cauliflower.
  5. Place the oil in a saute pan and heat over a medium high heat and add in the garlic clove that you have bashed, the turmeric and potatoes and saute until crispy and cooked through, which should take 5-7 minutes, adding cauliflower slices at the end for 60 seconds if you saved some.
  6. By know the cauliflower should be steamed, add to a blender to form a smooth puree and pass through a fine mesh sieve, add a little of the steaming water if required.
  7. Add this into your veloute and stir.
  8. If needed bring the veloute back to temperature being careful not to boil and serve, sprinkled with the potatoes and cauliflower slices.

Notes

I like to add drops of chive oil to add a hint of onion, simply mash some fresh chives with ground nut oil in a pestle and mortar or mini blender.

Nutrition Information:
Yield: 2 Serving Size: 1
Amount Per Serving: Calories: 402Total Fat: 20gSaturated Fat: 9gTrans Fat: 1gUnsaturated Fat: 9gCholesterol: 36mgSodium: 1003mgCarbohydrates: 49gFiber: 8gSugar: 9gProtein: 12g
Calorific details are provided by a third-party application and are to be used as indicative figures only.

10 thoughts on this Recipe:

    • Herb oils are great for finishing soups and you can do it with anything, although the ‘woodier’ the herb the longer you will need to infuse.

      Reply
  1. Lol oh I love you Brian – say it like it is and always, always true to yourself! Such admirable personal qualities ๐Ÿ˜€ Did you find out where to get them vegetable bones from in the end…? ๐Ÿ˜‰

    Reply
    • Still on the hunt for vegetable bones Jo, I have set up a hide in the garden and have set some ‘ethical’ vegetable traps too… Curses to these difficulties ๐Ÿ˜‰

      Reply
  2. I’ve never heard of this dish before, but it looks amazing! It’s not often you get real comfort food in vegetarian form, but you’ve definitely done it!

    Reply
  3. That’s a genius combination of flavours! It falls into my food categories and bridges both worlds so well. My mum needs to see this. ๐Ÿ™‚

    Reply

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