CockaLeekie Soup

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Recipes for CockaLeekie soup or Cock a Leekie soup date back to the 1500’s and my version embraces the traditional use of prunes and pearl barley and is a real winter warmer!

Recipes for CockaLeekie soup or Cock a Leekie soup date back to the 1500’s and my version embraces the traditional use of prunes and pearl barley and is a real winter warmer!

CockaLeekie Soup.

Regular readers will probably have formed the opinion that I am largely still a child. The name cockaleekie soup and the smile that the name of this recipe causes to spread across my face will only underline that!

Cockaleekie soup is a gloriously old-fashioned recipe and not just for its really rather wonderful name. In fact, the name really is not that imaginative.

It could very well be something a ‘cutsey’ parent comes up with to encourage a small child to eat their dinner.

In many ways, this hearty treat shares much in common with my rabbit stew not least in its use of pearl barley. This simple and cheap staple offers a wonderful nuttiness and body to a simple soup.

Many may be surprised to see prunes present in this recipe. It is a really traditional ingredient for this recipe.

They add wonderful bites of sweetness to the recipe and should not be skipped. I do however prefer them cooked in the stock rather than served as a garnish as was traditional.

If you liked this recipe, you should like this one too!  Grilled Cilantro Chicken Fajitas
Recipes for CockaLeekie soup or Cock a Leekie soup date back to the 1500’s and my version embraces the traditional use of prunes and pearl barley and is a real winter warmer!

Scotland’s National Soup.

Apparently, cockaleekie soup is considered to be Scotland’s national soup.

Now I have no idea how that stuff happens or indeed if it is true. Although I definitely now say the name in a bad Scottish accent since I found out!

The name and the recipe dates back to the 1500’s. When I say not very imaginative, it would have at one time contained an old cock (rooster you filthy animals) and leeks!

As we are no longer fresh out of the middle ages my cockaleekie soup recipe contains chicken and leeks.

I have often made this with cock when our sitter hatched too many of the buggers and it is fantastic.

But I guess not many of you are able to get your hands on a tough old rooster! As a result, this recipe is developed for a shop bought bird in mind.

Recipes for CockaLeekie soup or Cock a Leekie soup date back to the 1500’s and my version embraces the traditional use of prunes and pearl barley and is a real winter warmer!

Recipes with Funny Names.

My Cockaleekie soup recipe joins a pretty long list of recipe names that just make me smile.

I will continue to bring you all of my favourites as time passes by here on krumpli.

We already have crumpetsbubble and squeaktoad in the holeMulligatawny soup and of course rarebit.

I may even hove to break out another dessert and go full on childish with my rendition of ‘spotted dick’!

If you liked this recipe, you should like this one too!  Slow and Steady Butter Chicken
Recipes for CockaLeekie soup or Cock a Leekie soup date back to the 1500’s and my version embraces the traditional use of prunes and pearl barley and is a real winter warmer!
Recipes for CockaLeekie soup or Cock a Leekie soup date back to the 1500’s and my version embraces the traditional use of prunes and pearl barley and is a real winter warmer!
5 from 3 votes
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CockaLeekie Soup

Recipes for CockaLeekie soup or Cock a Leekie soup date back to the 1500's and my version embraces the traditional use of prunes and pearl barley and is a real winter warmer!

Course Soup
Cuisine British
Keyword CockaLeekie Soup, Leek Soup, Winter Warming Soups
Cook Time 1 hour 15 minutes
Total Time 1 hour 15 minutes
Servings 4
Calories 469 kcal
Author Brian Jones

Ingredients

  • 2 Chicken Legs Approx 300g each
  • 1 L Chicken Stock
  • 50 g Celery Finely sliced
  • 300 g Leeks Sliced into 5mm rings
  • 50 g Prunes
  • 1 Bayleaf
  • 1/2 Dried Thyme
  • 75 g Pearl Barley

Instructions

  1. Take your chicken stock and add in the diced celery, thyme, bay leaf and chicken legs and simmer for 40 minutes.

  2. After 40 minutes throw in the white part of the leaks, pearl barley and the prunes and cook for a further 20 minutes.

  3. Now add in the green part of the leaks and cook for a further 10-15 minutes.

  4. Finally remove the chicken legs and discard the bones and skin and cut up the meat and return to the pan.

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Recipes for CockaLeekie soup or Cock a Leekie soup date back to the 1500's and my version embraces the traditional use of prunes and pearl barley and is a real winter warmer! #soup #souprecipes #chickensouprewcipes #tradtionalrecipes #britishrecipes #soup #recipe #recipeideas #recipeoftheday
2018-09-17T07:38:21+00:00

6 Comments

  1. Danielle January 26, 2018 at 2:36 pm - Reply

    I’m happy to eat anything with leeks! I never considered adding prunes to a soup, what an interesting idea. I love old/different recipes like this. I mean, there are a million chicken soup recipes, so it is refreshing to see something different!

    • Brian Jones January 27, 2018 at 10:20 am - Reply

      We very quickly forget the old recipes in favour of what ever is doing well on Pinterest or Instagram, I’m much more interested in older flavour combinations and recipes.

  2. April January 26, 2018 at 2:30 pm - Reply

    The name does sound quite funny and cute. I love learning about traditional vintage recipes and this one is very vintage. I love all kinds of soups so I’m sure I would love this one. Perfect comfort food especially now that it’s so cold outside.

    • Brian Jones January 27, 2018 at 10:19 am - Reply

      Definitely old fashioned comfort food, enjoy.

  3. Natalie January 26, 2018 at 12:11 pm - Reply

    What an interesting recipe! I never heard of this soup before, but the combo of chicken and prunes sounds like something I should try. Thanks for a great recipe!

    • Brian Jones January 27, 2018 at 10:19 am - Reply

      Its a very old and traditional combination dating back to a time when travel and refrigeration were much more difficult… But they stand up really well in the modern kitchen.

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