Indonesian Braised Pork

Also known as Babi Chin this Indonesian braised pork is braised in a dark soy sauce based stock and is rich, sweet and full of wonderful aromatic flavours and not only fills your belly but makes your house smell amazing!

Indonesian Dark Soy Braised Pork, or Babi Chin.

I am always on the hunt for new stew recipes at this time of year. This braised pork stew from South East Asia is my latest discovery.

This Babi Chin recipe is essentially pork cooked in a dark soy sauce based stock. It is superb, dark, sweet, salty and all sorts of comforting.

A simple dish to cook with a relatively unusual technique I would definitely recommend stepping out of your comfort zone to give this a try.

It also smells insanely good leaving the most wonderful aroma hanging around for a couple of hours!

This recipe is from Indonesia and Malasia and is referred to as Peranakan or Nonya cuisine.

It is based in the foods of Chinese migrants. People who moved to South East Asia and the fusion of two foods resulted in a new cuisine.

This Indonesian braised pork is braised in a dark soy sauce based stock and is rich, sweet and full of wonderful aromatic flavours and not only fills your belly but makes your house smell amazing!

What Cut Of Meat To Buy To Cook Braised Pork.

The key to cooking braised pork is as much in the choice of meat as it is in the cooking technique.

The first thing you need to do is look for the tougher cuts of meat and they will often be cheaper and will be useless if cooked quickly.

For this braised pork recipe I use pork blade. It is the cut of meat from the upper part of the shoulder.

It contains a perfect amount of fat keeping it moist heling to keep in tender and juicy under long slow cooking.

You could, of course, use pork shoulder, but also consider pork belly. Pork belly works exceptionally well in this recipe.

Braising is the technique I usually prefer to use when cooking pulled pork or pulled beef.

However, in this braised pork recipe, the meat is not cooked to the point where it will shred. It will still be moist and succulent but it should not break apart when pushed with a fork.

This Indonesian braised pork is braised in a dark soy sauce based stock and is rich, sweet and full of wonderful aromatic flavours and not only fills your belly but makes your house smell amazing!

The Magic Of Fusion Food?

Fusion food often gets a bad reputation but real fusion food is at the heart of most of what we eat.

It is born of the movement of people and probably more clearly tells the story of the movement of people than anything I can think of.

This braised pork recipe is a mix of Chinese and South East Asian food.

This Indonesian braised pork is braised in a dark soy sauce based stock and is rich, sweet and full of wonderful aromatic flavours and not only fills your belly but makes your house smell amazing!

Fusion Foods From Around The World.

Probably my favourite example of Fusion food is my Beef Vindaloo recipe. My version of it is a Bengali take on a South Indian Curry, bought to me thanks to Indian Migration to the UK in the 60’s.

However, the Vindaloo was inspired by Portuguese influence in India from the 16th Century. It is descended from a dish called Carne de vinha d’alhos.

I  digress, I do that! Fusion food is often at the heart of everything we eat. Whether it by Italian American Food, German American Food, yes Hamburgers are German or Anglo Chinese or Anglo Indian food.

This Indonesian braised pork is braised in a dark soy sauce based stock and is rich, sweet and full of wonderful aromatic flavours and not only fills your belly but makes your house smell amazing!

This Indonesian braised pork is braised in a dark soy sauce based stock and is rich, sweet and full of wonderful aromatic flavours and not only fills your belly but makes your house smell amazing!

Indonesian Braised Pork

5 from 5 votes
This Indonesian braised pork is braised in a dark soy sauce based stock and is rich, sweet and full of wonderful aromatic flavours and not only fills your belly but makes your house smell amazing!
Course Main Course
Cuisine Indonesian
Keyword Boston Butt Recipes, Braised Pork Recipes, Indonesian Recipes
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 1 hour 10 minutes
Total Time 1 hour 30 minutes
Servings 2
Calories 912kcal
Author Brian Jones

Ingredients

  • 450 g Pork Blade AKA Boston Butt
  • 200 g Shallots
  • 8 Cloves Garlic
  • 3 Tbsp Corianader Seeds
  • 50 ml Hoisin Sauce
  • 50 ml Dark Soy Sauce
  • 1 1/2 Tsp Brown Sugar
  • 1/2 Tsp Salt
  • 1/2 Tsp Ground Cinnamon
  • 1/2 Tsp Ground Cloves
  • 1 Tbsp Cooking Oil
  • 750 ml Water

Instructions

  • Cut the shallots in half and then peel and finely slice.
  • Peel and mash your garlic into a puree.
  • Cut your pork into 2-2.5cm cubes.
  • Place a wok over a medium-high heat and toast the coriander seeds.
  • Grind the seeds and then add 2 tablespoons of water and stir to form a paste.
  • Return the wok to the heat and add the oil and heat on high.
  • Add the oil and stir fry the shallots for 2-3 minutes.
  • Throw in the garlic and stir fry for another 2 minutes.
  • Now add in the coriander paste, soy sauce and the hoisin sauce and stir continuously for 60 seconds.
  • Remover from the heat and add in the pork, sugar, salt, cinnamon and cloves and stir.
  • Pour over the water and bring back to a boil and then reduce the temperature to a simmer and allow to cook for an hour.

Video

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Readers Comments

18 thoughts on “Indonesian Braised Pork”

  1. High Brian. Lovely recipe and smells amazing. The method however does not tell you when to add the soy sauce and we were a little worried to add 750ml of water as it washed the pork clean.

    • Hi Steph, the aroma is wonderful isn1t it. I updated the recipe a couple of days ago to fix the soy sauce thing, it is in step 9 🙂

      The water thing is definitely őroving to be controversial, I’m making a video this weekend to add to the post to show how it works. When I started making this I was skeptical too but, it works!

  2. I’ve tried this but not with much success. Firstly your notes don’t say when to add the soy sauce, so I added it with the hoisin. Next it was an awful lot of water. I simmrred it for an hour but it was still pale and there was lots of water still. I gave it another hour and it was a little darker and thicker but nothing like your photo. Any tips?

    • Hi Jane… Thank you for taking the time to write to me, I have updated my recipe with the correct spot to add the dark soy sauce, you were correct.

      On to the issue with the lack of reduction of the sauce, I confess that I am at a little of a loss.

      This recipe has become a firm favourite for us and I cook it regularly with no issues, my first thought relates to either your cooking device or level of heat. If you are using a deep pan with a shallow lid then you will not get as much evaporation and reduction, likewise if the temperature is not hot enough.

      I have a plan that will hopefully clear things up a little for you. I will add this into my cooking schedule for next weekend and I will turn it in to a video, it will probably take me a little while to process the video, but when I have it done I will drop you an email. It should clear up some of this misunderstanding.

    • Hi Jane… Just an update to let you know I have added a video at the top of this page so you can see the level of simmer and also the size and shape of the wok I use which will also have an impact on the evaporation rates.

    • Enjoy Chris, if you get a set of battery powered scales they will skip back and forth between the two and have a ‘tare’ function to set to zero. Priceless in the kitchen and cost just a few dollars.

  3. What an original recipe Brian! I am sure the house does smell amazing. I admit that at 1st I thought the recipe had prunes in it but then I looked a little closer and ‘aha’ I see it now! You make even rice look good!!

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