Skip to Content

Indonesian Braised Pork

Also known as Babi Chin this Indonesian braised pork is braised in a dark soy sauce based stock and is rich, sweet and full of wonderful aromatic flavours and not only fills your belly but makes your house smell amazing!

This Indonesian braised pork is braised in a dark soy sauce based stock and is rich, sweet and full of wonderful aromatic flavours and not only fills your belly but makes your house smell amazing!

Indonesian Dark Soy Braised Pork, or Babi Chin.

I am always on the hunt for new stew recipes at this time of year. This recipe from South East Asia is my latest discovery.

Babi Chin is essentially pork cooked in a dark soy sauce based stock. It is superb, dark, sweet, salty and all sorts of comforting.

A simple dish to cook with a relatively unusual technique I would definitely recommend stepping out of your comfort zone to give this a try.

It also smells insanely good leaving the most wonderful aroma hanging around for a couple of hours!

This recipe is from Indonesia and Malasia and is referred to as Peranakan or Nonya cuisine. Arguably the most well-known dish from this region is beef rendang.

It is based in the foods of Chinese migrants. People who moved to South East Asia and the fusion of two foods resulted in a new cuisine.

This Indonesian braised pork is braised in a dark soy sauce based stock and is rich, sweet and full of wonderful aromatic flavours and not only fills your belly but makes your house smell amazing!

What Cut Of Meat To Buy To Cook Braised Pork.

The key to cooking braising pork is as much in the choice of meat as it is in the cooking technique.

The first thing you need to do is look for the tougher cuts of meat and they will often be cheaper and will be useless if cooked quickly.

For this braised pork recipe I use pork blade. It is the cut of meat from the upper part of the shoulder.

I use it because it contains a perfect amount of fat keeping it moist helping to keep it tender and juicy.

You could, of course, use pork shoulder, but also consider pork belly. Pork belly works exceptionally well in this recipe.

In this recipe, the meat is not cooked to the point where it will shred. It will still be moist and succulent but it should not break apart when pushed with a fork.

This Indonesian braised pork is braised in a dark soy sauce based stock and is rich, sweet and full of wonderful aromatic flavours and not only fills your belly but makes your house smell amazing!

The Magic Of Fusion Food!

Fusion food often gets a bad reputation but real fusion food is at the heart of most of what we eat.

It is born of the movement of people and probably more clearly tells the story of the movement of people than anything I can think of.

This braised pork recipe is a mix of Chinese and South East Asian food.

Probably my favourite example of Fusion food is my Beef Vindaloo recipe. My version of it is a Bengali take on a South Indian Curry, bought to me thanks to Indian Migration to the UK in the 60’s.

However, the Vindaloo was inspired by Portuguese influence in India from the 16th Century. It is descended from a dish called Carne de vinha d’alhos.

Fusion food is often at the heart of everything we eat. Whether it by Italian American Food, German American Food, yes Hamburgers are German or Anglo Chinese or Anglo Indian food.

This Indonesian braised pork is braised in a dark soy sauce based stock and is rich, sweet and full of wonderful aromatic flavours and not only fills your belly but makes your house smell amazing!
Yield: 2 Servings

Indonesian Braised Pork

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 1 hour 10 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 30 minutes

This Indonesian braised pork is braised in a dark soy sauce based stock and is rich, sweet and full of wonderful aromatic flavours and not only fills your belly but makes your house smell amazing!

Ingredients

  • 450 g Pork Blade, AKA Boston Butt
  • 200 g Shallots
  • 8 Cloves Garlic
  • 3 Tbsp Corianader Seeds
  • 50 ml Hoisin Sauce
  • 50 ml Dark Soy Sauce
  • 1 1/2 Tsp Brown Sugar
  • 1/2 Tsp Salt
  • 1/2 Tsp Ground Cinnamon
  • 1/2 Tsp Ground Cloves
  • 1 Tbsp Cooking Oil
  • 750 ml Water

Instructions

  1. Cut the shallots in half and then peel and finely slice.
  2. Peel and mash your garlic into a puree.
  3. Cut your pork into 2-2.5cm cubes.
  4. Place a wok over a medium-high heat and toast the coriander seeds.
  5. Grind the seeds and then add 2 tablespoons of water and stir to form a paste.
  6. Return the wok to the heat and add the oil and heat on high.
  7. Add the oil and stir fry the shallots for 2-3 minutes.
  8. Throw in the garlic and stir fry for another 2 minutes.
  9. Now add in the coriander paste, soy sauce and the hoisin sauce and stir continuously for 60 seconds.
  10. Remover from the heat and add in the pork, sugar, salt, cinnamon and cloves and stir.
  11. Pour over the water and bring back to a boil and then reduce the temperature to a simmer and allow to cook for an hour.

Nutrition Information:

Yield:

2

Serving Size:

1

Amount Per Serving: Calories: 889Total Fat: 48gSaturated Fat: 15gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 28gCholesterol: 235mgSodium: 2687mgCarbohydrates: 38gFiber: 5gSugar: 18gProtein: 76g

Did you make this recipe?

If you made this recipe, I'd love to see what you did and what I can do better, share a picture with me on Instagram and tag me @krumplibrian and tell me how it went!

Close up portrait image of a leek and salami pasta with paccheri pasta served in a white bowl
Previous
Salami and Leek Pasta
This simple bacon wrapped pork tenderloin recipe is served with a fantastic lentil, pecan nut and cabbage side dish dressed with a mustard dressing.
Next
Bacon Wrapped Pork Tenderloin With Cabbage and Lentils
Skip to Recipe