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Hungarian Catfish Paprikash, Harcsapaprikas

>>>Hungarian Catfish Paprikash, Harcsapaprikas
Catfish Paprikash or harcsapaprikas is every but as well known in Hungary as chicken based cousin, a wonderfully rich decadent fish dish.

Paprikash is a Hungarian dish known in the main for its chicken variant, I’ve seen chicken paprikash recipes attempted by writers from all over the world but it’s lesser known cousin Catfish Paprikash of harscapaprikás as it is known around these parts is just as common in our corner of Hungary. We live not far from lake Tisza, a man made lake designed to alleviate the flood risk on the Hungarian great plain and it is teaming with fish.

I have been pretty damning of fresh water fish here over the years and I will not go back on that, however there is on fresh water fish that I think is really worth eating. The good old catfish, a beast of a fish with a good meaty and firm texture, it seems to be popular with cooks in the deep south of the US although I rarely see others cooking with it, if you are one of those people who have never cooked with it then I would urge you to give it a try.

Catfish Paprikash or harcsapaprikas is every but as well known in Hungary as chicken based cousin, a wonderfully rich decadent fish dish.

The keen eyed among you may have spotted me using pasta as a side dish for this catfish paprikash, something I genuinely try and avoid where ever possible… I just don’t get it, but csusza teszta the name for this rather foxy little pasta affair that I can’t even translate really does work so well with this dish. In fact it just works well with everything, at the moment it is my wifes favourite way to eat pasta and she is constantly looking for excuses to put it on the menu.

If you liked this recipe, you should like this one too!  Quick Asian Chicken and Shrimp Soup

Go figure my wifes favourite pasta dish is as Hungarian as the Rubiks Cube! If you want to make this recipe and are struggling to find catfish, give it a go with some monkfish tail, if you do please let me know how it works out, I suspect it will need cooking a smidge longer but I would love to give it a try, alas monkfish is not readily found here in the Hungarian countryside.

Catfish Paprikash or harcsapaprikas is every but as well known in Hungary as chicken based cousin, a wonderfully rich decadent fish dish.
5 from 5 votes
Catfish Paprikash or harcsapaprikas is every but as well known in Hungary as chicken based cousin, a wonderfully rich decadent fish dish.
Hungarian Catfish Paprikash, Harcsapaprikas
Cook Time
25 mins
Total Time
25 mins
 

Cat Fish Paprikash or harcsapaprikas is every but as well known in Hungary as chicken based cousin, a wonderfully rich decadent fish dish from Central Europe.

Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Hungarian
Servings: 2
Calories: 693 kcal
Author: Brian Jones
Ingredients
  • 300 g Catfish Fillets Cut into large chunks
  • 50 g Shallot Finely diced
  • 2 Tbsp Cooking Oil Neutral
  • 150 ml Sour Cream
  • 50 g Quark Sub for Ricotta cheese at a push
  • 100 g Bacon Sliced
  • 100 g Lasagna Sheets Broken into irregular shapes
  • 50 g Butter
  • 1 Tomato Deseeded and cut into wedges
  • 1 Tbsp: Sweet Paprika Hungarian of course 😉 Avoid smoked paprika if possible
  • Salt To taste
  • Pepper To taste
Instructions
  1. Add the cooking oil to a large skillet over a medium heat and fry the diced shallot for 3-4 minutes until softened but not coloured.

  2. Add the paprika to the fish to coat and add 2 tablespoons of water and gently mix together.

  3. Add the fish and paprika mix to the shallots and gently fry the fish ensuring the heat is not too high as it is easy to burn the paprika. Cook for 2-3 minutes.

  4. Now stir in the sour cream, test for seasoning and bake in the oven at 150°C for 10 minutes whilst we prepare the pasta side dish.

  5. Cook the pasta as per the instructions in the packet.

  6. Whilst the pasta is cooking fry off the bacon in a frying pan, when the pasta is cooked transfer to the bacon and add the butter and tomato wedges and stir to combine.

  7. Serve on a plate sprinkled with the quark and the paprikash from the oven.

2018-04-18T12:01:35+00:00

10 Comments

  1. Natalie January 12, 2018 at 8:43 am - Reply

    I never tried catfish paprikash, as I tasted only the chicken version, but it sounds delicious! I love fish main courses and this looks so good that I will definitely try it soon.

  2. Gina January 12, 2018 at 12:13 pm - Reply

    Looks amazing! Very different cuisine for me cant wait to try it!

    • Brian Jones January 16, 2018 at 8:17 am - Reply

      Always good to introduce people to something new.

  3. Kristen January 12, 2018 at 2:10 pm - Reply

    This is just a good idea to use the same technique for chicken for fish–the flavors are just incredible.

    • Brian Jones January 16, 2018 at 8:17 am - Reply

      It is a very different technique to the way chickne paprikash is traditionally made but a very similar flavour.

  4. lisa January 12, 2018 at 3:20 pm - Reply

    This looks and sounds absolutely fabulous — so inventive too. I admit to not liking catfish, because I typically get the one piece that tastes like mud (why???) I have access to lots of other fresh fish, though – so maybe I’ll try this with a different variety. Thanks for the inspiration!

    • Brian Jones January 16, 2018 at 8:18 am - Reply

      I reckon this would work wonderfully with monkfish and I would give it a try myself if I didn’t have to sell a kidney to be able to afford some here in landlocked Hungary 😉

  5. Tara January 12, 2018 at 3:26 pm - Reply

    I’ve tried Sertéspaprikás, but not catfish yet. This looks delicious! I love how you paired it with the diced pickled cucumbers.

    • Brian Jones January 16, 2018 at 8:19 am - Reply

      Bizarrely enough pork is the least common meat to find in a paprikash here in Hungary, which is really odd as it is really common in every other way 😉

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